Archive for the ‘Don’t Use These Words’ Category

Another Word to Delete from Your Biz Vocabulary: WAHM/Mompreneur

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Never, ever refer to yourself as a WAHM or mompreneur/mumpreneur. You won’t be taken seriously.

You might be one, but it’s irrelevant to business and not what you should be focusing your prospects on.

Because here’s what people that attracts, what they think:

Oh, a nice little work at home mommy. She’ll be grateful to get the measly $5/$10 bucks an hour I pay her.”

I was watching Shark Tank the other day and this one entrepreneur (a woman doctor, by the way) was asked if she had any reps selling for her. She told them she didn’t; instead she had “6 moms” doing that work.

You see the implication don’t you? I couldn’t help but shout at the TV!

She was devaluing these women because they were “moms.” They were doing her selling and managing of sales for her, but were presumably being paid peanuts compared to what she would be paying for “real” sales reps.

This is exactly why you don’t want prospects viewing you as a work-at-home mom. You want them seeing you as nothing less than a businesswoman and an expert in administration.

It’s wrong and it shouldn’t be, but the fact remains that when you advertise/market yourself as a “work-at-home-mom,” people will devalue you and think of you as something other/less than a businessperson. And they will accordingly expect to only pay you peanuts.

I don’t know why more moms don’t get fired up about this. As a mom myself (though my daughter is grown now) you better believe I am presenting myself as nothing but a business person because anyone who shortchanges me, shortchanges my family/kids.

I would be just as responsible for that shortchanging by settling for crumbs and marketing myself in ways that caused my marketplace to devalue me.

Use that mama bear energy to get good and fierce about learning whatever you need to learn so you can start marketing like a proper business, get proper cients and start making the kind of money you and your family deserve.

Want Better Clients? Do These Two Things

Want Better Clients? Do These Two ThingsWant better clients? Raise your rates.

The worst clients, the ones who create the majority of the problems, are the loudest whiners and least appreciative, are the ones who pay the lowest rates.

When you raise your fees (or simply charge properly professional fees period, not cheap employee level wages), you will get a whole other (higher) caliber of clientele.

Want better clients? Stop calling yourself a virtual assistant.

Assistant is a term of employment. And people who think you are an assistant are the ones who expect the cheapest rates.

That’s because they do not see you as an independent professional in the expertise of administration. They see you as their little “virtual worker” and expect to pay you like one.

Continuing to call yourself a virtual assistant is like calling yourself a teapot. You have keep explaining that even though you call yourself one, you aren’t one.

How much sense does that make?

Why make your conversations and relationships more difficult than they need in the first place by calling yourself:

a) something that you aren’t (and as a business owner, you aren’t anyone’s assistant), and

b) that sets all the wrong perceptions, connotations and expectations that make it harder for you to get the respect you want and the professional level fees you need?

Here’s what else happens…

When you stop calling yourself an assistant, you also begin to stop thinking like one.

It’s the beginning of a huge mindset shift that occurs and you begin to start thinking more like a business owner, administrative expert and leader in your own business.

That shift in your own self-perception and identity is what also leads you down the path to better clients and higher earning.

Stop with the VA Crap

If you’re going to be an Administrative Consultant, be an Administrative Consultant.

Stop with the VA crap. They’re not the same thing and all you’re doing is creating confusion by trying to incorporate both terms.

Pick one or the other, not both.

(And I recommend if you’re going to be a grown-up business owner, you choose to be an Administrative Consultant. When you run a business, you are not anyone’s assistant, ever.)

This Isn’t the Sims

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This isn’t the Sims.

You are real.

Your business is real.

The work you do, which is also real, creates real benefits and results for clients in their businesses and their lives.

There’s nothing virtual about any of that, and those are the only things that matter.

A business is a business.

So stop using such a ridiculous, superfluous, attenuating word as “virtual” in your biz name and marketing.

Are You Being Treated Like a Dog?

Are You Being Treated Like a Dog?

I was reading a blog post from a fellow talking about how he communicates with his assistant. It amounted to what I call being grunted at. One or two word commands and directives.

I would never allow a client to talk to me like that. And you couldn’t pay me to work with anyone like that. Not for any amount of money. Because it’s demeaning and dehumanizing.

Countless people in our industry have written to me over the years about feeling demoralized working with clients who treat them like nameless, faceless robots.

Here’s how this happens:

They come into this industry and start their businesses with this crazy idea that they’re supposed to be good little assistants, seen but not heard, doing everything they are told, practically the family dog who’s supposed to fetch and shake and rollover on command.

They work with clients like they’re on an assembly-line, like they’re still that employee waiting to be told what to do, letting clients tell them how their business is going to be run and how things are going to be.

But you are NOT an assistant.

You’re running a business to deliver a specific professional expertise, no different than a doctor, lawyer, accountant, etc.

You are someone with special skills, talents and experience in the art and craft of administrative support. An expert. A specialist.

If you want a happy business and life, put your name and face on your business. Be the expert.

YOU tell clients how you operate and how you will work together. YOU tell them what the policies, procedures and protocols for working with you are. YOU tell them what your standards and values are, where the boundaries are and what the rules and guidelines are.

And in having standards, that includes expecting and informing clients that you expect to be treated with the dignity of a human being and spoken to in complete sentences.

You’re not a robot or a vending machine they are barking orders at or punching orders into.

Don’t allow them to view you as their personal assistant/servant/gopher or substitute employee.

I always use the example of attorney and accountant because that’s exactly how I want clients to equate the nature of our relationship, that it will be like the one they have with their attorney or accountant. How they work together and speak with them is the same way they will be working with and speaking to me.

Dump any client who can’t get with the program. If they want an employee, that’s who they need to hire.

And then, when you are left with the ideal clients who treat you with the proper manner and respect accorded to professionals who are helping them, treat each and every one of them like the VIPs they are.

That doesn’t mean being obsequious and subservient. It means making each one feel special, important and valued. And you’ll be able to do that at a high level for those clients because you aren’t allowing yourself to be demeaned and having your morale and energy zapped by crappy ones.

Oh, and stop calling yourself a virtual assistant. You call yourself an assistant and then are shocked/irritated/perplexed when they treat you like one.

Assistant is a term of employment. Stop using that word. It’s ridiculous in this day and age of business to be using that word.

This is why we are the ADMINISTRATIVE CONSULTANTS Association.

Dear Danielle: Should I Use the Word “Virtual” in My Biz Name?

In this episode of What Would Danielle Say, Lynn wants to know if she should use the word “virtual” in her business name.

Dear Danielle:

My business name is BD Virtual. I read your blog post about What’s In a Name and the part about not having “virtual assistant” or “assistant” in your name. Is it a good idea to have virtual in your name? If not, should I consider admin services consulting like you were talking about. Is BD Virtual okay of a name? —Lynn Smith

Hi Lynn :)

If you follow me for long, you will find that I frequently advise/remind people to delete the word “virtual” from their biz vocabulary (among others).

A business is a business. There’s nothing virtual about it.

Is a business more “pretend” or of less quality if it’s run out of a home office or on the road? Is it more of a business if it’s located in a rented office?

Does an attorney who works from home and conducts most of his meetings over the phone have any less of a legal practice?

Is a doctor or accountant or designer or (fill in the blank for whatever other independent service professional comes to mind) “virtual” just because he works from his own location and/or his clients go to him, he doesn’t go to them?

By that logic, then all businesses are “virtual” in that they perform their services from their own place of operation (regardless of where that may be), not the client’s.

But we don’t qualify those businesses like that so why should you qualify yours in that way?

This is why I advise people to stop using the word “virtual.” It’s a silly word and puts a negative, subpar, “less than a real business” spin on things.

One of the challenges of a professional services business like ours (where we do not have physical storefronts that clients can walk into like brick-and-mortar businesses do) is instilling credibility, trustworthiness and rapport.

Therefore, you want your business to present itself in every way you can as no different from any other professional a client would hire to provide some kind of expertise.

Any word that detracts or qualifies your business as something “other than” or “different from” a real business and professional service like any other makes it more difficult to establish that credibility and trustworthiness.

And this is what the word “virtual” does… it says that your business is not a “real” business, it’s something “other than.”

And why do that? Why qualify it in any way except that it is a real business like any other?

This is what I mean by a business is a business. Where the business is located and/or where you work from is of no relevance or importance to the matter.

Regarding your other question, whether you should call it Administrative Consultant, that depends on whether you actually are one or not.

An Administrative Consultant is not the same thing as a virtual assistant. The terms are not interchangeable.

Where “virtual assistant” has become the proverbial junk/miscellaneous drawer of terms of anyone doing anything and everything, which is not a definition or category of anything, it’s just a gopher basically (what Seth Godin would refer to as a meandering generality), an Administrative Consultant is someone who specifically specializes in the business of providing ongoing administrative support (what Seth Godin calls a meaningful specific). That is their business category and their specialty.

The other distinction is that when you are in business, for both legal and practical reasons, you are not anyone’s assistant. Administrative Consultants are independent professionals (in the same way that attorneys, accountants, designers, etc., are independent professionals) who provide clients with the expertise of strategic administrative support. They are not day-to-day substitute employees or “alternative staff.” They are not staff in any way.

So if your specialization and expertise is administrative support and you view yourself as an independent professional (not a staff member, assistant or outsourced worker), then Administrative Consultant would fit you.

Since it sounds like you are just starting your business and still in the naming phase, be sure to also check out the Naming Your Business category of my blog. I have several posts with information and ideas to help you in that process.

Thanks for the question and I hope this provides you with some understanding and clarity. All my best!

There’s No Such Thing as “General” Administrative Support

There’s no such thing as “general” administrative support.

Well, there is, but if you are only providing something “generally,” you deserve to be low-paid.

Administration is the backbone of every business in the world. Without proper, attentive administration, a business flounders and fails.

Administration, therefore, can only be provided—properly—when it is uniquely geared for that client’s unique business set-up, needs, challenges and goals.

And when that is the case, it is anything but “general.”

So stop using such a derogatory, devaluing word in reference to your administrative expertise and support. What you do makes all the difference in whether a client’s business succeeds or fails. There’s nothing general about that.

When you use the word “general,” you create a subtext that sabotages and contradicts your efforts in attracting well-paying clients who value your expertise.

What you are telling the world and your prospects, in between the lines, is that the support is “less than” and less important than other things they could be spending their money on.

So you are telling them to devalue it at the same time that you are trying to earn their business and be paid properly just by using the word “general” in reference to your administration and support.

Shift your thinking about what you do and it’s value in the world. What you do is vital, it’s important and it’s specific.

Delete This Word from Your Biz Vocabulary: Staff

Here’s another word to delete from your business and marketing vocabulary: staff.

From both a legal and practical standpoint, unless you are on their payroll as an employee or you are running a temp/staffing agency, you are not any client’s “staff.”

Using that word miseducates clients and sets the wrong understandings and expectations.

Administrative Support Is Not General

Don’t call administrative support “general.”

You are putting it in a very demeaning, unimportant light when you say that.

Administrative support is a very specific skill, expertise and sensibility, and is absolutely one of THE most important aspects involved in a well-run business.

Administration is the very backbone of every business. The administrative engine can either make or break a business.

Therefore, you must stop talking about administrative support in such derogatory ways.

If you don’t value and honor what you do, and view it and portray it in all it’s vital, integral relevance and importance to the success or failure of a business, prospective clients won’t either.

What you need to understand yourself is that administrative support is a specialization and category of business and service in and of itself.

There’s nothing general (or unimportant) about it.

So stop saying that! Get rid of the word “general” from your business and marketing vocabulary altogether.

Marketing Tip: Don’t Call Yourself a WAHM Anything

Marketing Tip: Don’t call yourself a WAHM anything.

(For those who don’t know, WAHM stands for work-at-home-mom.)

No one cares that you “work from home” or that you are “mom.”

It’s completely irrelevant and (worse) detracts from the kind of professional image that allows you to command respect, credibility and professional level fees.

Business is business. Your parental status and where you happen to work is of no import to anyone else whatsoever.

Not that there is anything wrong with either of those things.

The problem is one of connotation.

What people picture when they hear the term WAHM is someone distractedly sitting around in her pajamas with a squalling kid on each  hip rather than a competent, highly skilled professional and expert who is working in a committed business.

You wouldn’t go to a job interview in your sweats, would you? The image that would project would not be at all suitable and would not show that you took the matter very seriously.

Well, the words and terms you use to to market your business are the same thing.

They are your dress in print and need to reflect and elicit the kind of image in clients that they can trust and feel confident in.

Instead, focus the attention on the needs, goals and challenges of your clients and their businesses.