Archive for May, 2017

Remember What You Are Trying to Accomplish

Remember What You Are Trying to Accomplish

It’s useful to interact with colleagues: to support each other, share triumphs and foibles, get ideas, collaborate, and find resources.

Remember, though, that you’re trying to build a business, not belong to a club.

It’s not helpful to your business or your potential clients to look and sound the same as everyone else.

Your business needs you to express your individuality, your own thoughts and ideas, in your own unique way of speaking.

It’s one of the easiest ways to differentiate your business and make it stand out in the crowd.

You become much more interesting and compelling to your site visitors in this way.

Wishing You a Peaceful, Reflective Memorial Day

Wishing You a Peaceful, Reflective Memorial Day

I wish we didn’t have wars where our men and women lose their lives so needlessly, that we didn’t have people in high places playing cavalier games with those lives.

I can only imagine the anguish their friends and loved ones go through who have lost someone in this way.

I imagine this is a very sad and somber day for many when they are reminded of their loss.

But maybe also a day where they share their pride and celebrate those lives.

My heart goes out to the families, and I honor the service and courage of our military men and women and the sacrifices they (and their families) made and continue to make in service to our country.

Much love to you all.

❤️

Newsflash: No One Cares About Your Brochure

Newsflash: No One Cares About Your Brochure

People would save themselves SO much wasted effort if they listened to me on this.

So many folks, when they’re new in this business, waste a lot of time and money putting together a brochure.

And 99% of them end up in the trash.

Why?

Among other reasons, it’s because your brochure is all about you and your business.

And clients don’t care about you. They care about their business and their problems.

Not only is a brochure an unproductive tool, it’s the wrong medium with which to reach your audience.

Clients have a problem they want solved. Your job is to identify their overarching problem and show them how you solve that problem.

But here’s the thing: even if clients generally have the same problem—lack of administrative support—that problem manifests differently and they experience that problem in very different ways depending on the specific field/industry/profession they’re in.

It’s impossible for you to speak to every aspect of this problem for every conceivable kind of client and industry/profession in the world all at the same time.

When you try, the result is more of the same boring, generic nothingness that everyone else puts out there, that doesn’t capture the interest or excitement of clients in the least.

Specificity is the key ingredient that will bring your message to life.

Which is why you want to identify their problem and address the way they experience that problem, along with the way you help solve that problem for them, within the context of their specific field/industry/profession.

Instead of putting together a brochure, your time is better spent identifying a target market.

(HINT: A target market is simply a field/industry/profession that you cater your administrative support to.)

Once you have a target market to focus on and give your efforts direction, identifying how they specifically experience the problem of lack of administrative support and how that manifests in their business—as well as how you can help them—is much clearer.

From there, you’ll have a much easier time creating your website marketing message that, instead of speaking generically and forgettably to “everyone,” will speak more uniquely, meaningfully and compellingly to that specific group—and get you clients!

Ditch the brochures. You don’t need them:

  1. No one wants your brochure (or your flyer or post card, for that matter).
  2. I guarantee, as a new business owner, you don’t know enough yet to make a good one that would pay off for all the time and money you put into it. You might as well flush that money down the toilet for as much good as they are going to do you.
  3. Most of your marketing isn’t going to be done in-person anyway.

Invest the time, money and learning instead in your website and making it the best it can be.

(And if you need help, which most people do, my guide will show you exactly how to structure it and walk you through creating a marketing message gets results.)

Using Terminology Correctly

Using Terminology Correctly

It’s important to use correct terminology in business.

Communication, and ensuring there is understanding, hinges upon using language and terms correctly.

For example, a lot of people use the term “outsourcing” incorrectly.

Outsourcing is when a business (typically a large company) offloads specific functions, or even a whole department, to a contractor to perform that service independently.

Like when you call a company and they have outsourced their customer service to an offshore call center. That is both outsourcing and offshoring. There is little or no personal, collaborative relationship.

Or when a service subcontracts their client work out to a third party provider… that is also outsourcing. 

Administrative Consulting is the opposite of that.

Administrative Consulting is a one-on-one, direct and personal, collaborative partnership with the client providing a right-hand relationship of administrative support across-the-board. The client and Administrative Consultant work together closely and personally.

That’s not to say that someone can’t or shouldn’t be in an outsourcing business if that’s what they choose to do. However, that is not an Administrative Consulting business.

If you’re in the outsourcing business, you are not in the Administrative Consulting business.