Archive for September, 2015

What a Tale of Two Laundromats Has to Do with YOUR Business

What a Tale of Two Laundromats Has to Do with YOUR Business

I had to go to a laundromat recently to wash an extra large faux fur comforter as my washer is too small for the job.

Ended up having an engaging business conversation with the owner after sharing with him how I had first gone to another laundromat and immediately turned around and walked right back out.

Why?

Because it was gross and filthy! Looked like it hadn’t been cleaned in years, flotsam left in the washers, garbage cans overflowing, every other machine broken, dirty water all over the floor, no attendant to be found. Disgusting! That’s when I Googled for alternatives and found his place.

So I drove over there, and let me tell you, it was like night and day!

Clean, gleaming surfaces everywhere you looked. Every single washer and dryer extra large and roomy… and NOT broken. A sparking clean restroom. A little “convenience store” counter to buy supplies and munchies if you like. And the owner there sweeping the floor, wiping down and checking machines, picking up lint.

He immediately recognized I was new and came right over to assist me. This was the Ritz-Carlton of laundromats compared to the first one I went to!

I told the owner how impressed I was with his place, how awful the other one was and how I had immediately left.

He thanked me so much and was truly touched as he takes great pride in his business.

He said it might be a little higher priced, but you pay for quality.

“Yesssss!” I exclaimed.

I added that I didn’t think it was all that expensive anyway (my complete wash and dry was only $7 total) because if you go to a crappy laundromat with broken, inefficient machines, you’d end up pumping in way more time and money than that.

Perfect example of how the so-called “cheap” comes out expensive.

He couldn’t agree more and told me how one time some guy from the other laundromat I had first gone to had come in and was badmouthing his place to all his customers, telling them how expensive this place was and how much cheaper it was at the other (crappy) place. The owner told the guy, “Hey, I don’t know what you’re trying to do, but my customers are free to go wherever they choose.”

I said, “But you know what? Don’t you change a thing. Because you have different markets. Their market is not YOUR market. I am very happy to pay well for a clean, safe place, state-of-art machines that actually work and do the job right the first time, and a helpful, friendly owner like you.”

So many great things about this:

  • Knowing who your market and ideal client are (hint: it’s not the short-sighted, penny-pinching miser who cares about nothing but saving a buck at the expense of everything else).
  • Understanding your value in relation to what your market and ideal client values.
  • Pricing profitably so you can provide great quality and customer experience.

Be thinking about how this translates in your business:

  • What can you do (or continue to do) in your business to give your clients and prospective clients a great experience dealing with your company?
  • How does pride in your work and service show up for your clients?
  • Do you see the correlation between pricing well and being able to take great care of clients?
  • Are you pricing at a level that allows you do great work, focus on ideal clients and give them a great experience?
  • How well to you understand who your market and ideal clients are? Who do you WANT to be your clients?

Marketing Tip: Attend Webinars and Teleconferences in Your Target Market’s Industry

Marketing Tip: Attend Webinars and Teleconference in Your Target Market's Industry

Every industry conducts webinars and teleconferences for its members. These present yet another great opportunity to connect, learn more about and interact with your target market.

For example, my target market is solo attorneys in business, intellectual property and entertainment law. The legal industry has thousands upon thousands of continuing education webinars and teleconferences many of which are open to anyone in legal services, not just attorneys, and many of which are free or low-cost.

So be sure to attend the webinars and teleconferences in your target market’s industry because it puts you smack dab in the middle of a “room” full of them. Then be sure to ask at least one question or otherwise participate in the discussion.

When you do that, you have a non-salesy, legitimate reason to introduce yourself, give the name of your business (and/or URL) and briefly explain that you provide admin support for those in the [YOUR TARGET MARKET] industry.

Sometimes the Q&A/discussion is also done by chat which is yet another opportunity to state your name, biz and provide your biz URL.

Plus, when you ask smart questions relevant to the topic, it makes your business look good, too. It inspires confidence and credibility because it’s a demonstration of the kind of smarts and sensibility you’d bring to table for your clients.

If you haven’t chosen a target market yet (a target market is simply a field/industry/profession that you cater your admin support to), be sure to download my free guide How to Choose Your Target Market. 

Delete the Word “Freelancer” from Your Business Vocabulary

Presently 81% of freelancers have trouble getting paid by their clients and, on average, each unpaid freelancers is owed over $6,000 in salary.”

Language like this drives me freaking nuts, and it’s responsible for the perpetuation of freelancers continuing to NOT UNDERSTAND ANYTHING.

Freelancers are BUSINESS OWNERS.

They don’t get paid a “salary.” That is what EMPLOYEES get, which freelancers are not.

What they are owed is $X in unpaid invoices and fees from deadbeat clients (who probably think and act like they are employers because the moron freelancer doesn’t set them straight in the first place).

If they understood better the distinction about being in business for themselves, they would know not to allow any client to get that far into debt with them in the first place, stop work before it ever gets that bad, and if they were really being smart, require more money (if not 100%) upfront.

It’s yet another example of why no one should be using the term “freelancer.”

Not only does it make people think of someone who is only casually, incidentally, haphazardly working on the side for pocket money, as a result it sets the wrong expectations and mindsets in clients that are a cause of a lot of these issues in the first place.

Perfect example — here’s what one deadbeat client retorted to a “freelancer”:

This isn’t your full time job, this is just a side job, so why do I need to pay you?

As an Administrative Consultant, you are not a freelancer. You are in an actual committed, professional business with the intention of providing an ongoing and well-rounded body of support as a whole to clients for the long-term. (And if you aren’t, then you’re not an Administrative Consultant.)

You will be doing yourself a huge favor by deleting that word from your business vocabulary and never using it again.