Archive for August 27th, 2015

Ideas for Finding Clients

Ideas for Finding Clients

Here are some ideas for where to find potential clients to help get your creative thinking going.

Since I work with solo attorneys (specifically in the business, intellectual property and entertainment law realm), that’s the target market I know best. However, anyone can extrapolate from these ideas to fit their own target market.

One of the reasons and benefits to have a target market is that it helps you more easily identify where to find clients. Because once you know who you are focusing on, that will tell you what support they need, how to craft your message, and where to begin looking for them.

(By the way, a target market is simply a specific industry/field/profession that you cater your administrative support to.)

For example, if you work with attorneys, the next step is to identify any and all places where you may be able to meet, connect and interact with, and get in front of said attorneys.

What do attorneys deal in very often? Lawsuits.

Where do they go when they litigate those lawsuits? To the courthouse, right?

So, are there any opportunities there? Are there attorney bulletin boards where you can put your business card, flyer, brochure or other handout? Is there a lawyers lounge where you can do the same? What about a law library?

What about your local and state bar associations? Do they have any online forums and listservs you can hop on? Do they have a print newsletter or online blog? If so, you could offer to contribute some articles (and thereby market your business in the process). Find out what advertising opportunities they have. For example, my state’s bar newsletter has a $50 advertising fee which is a small price to pay to get a targeted ad in front of all their attorney subscribers that gets them to my website or video presentation.

Ideally, you are focusing on the solos and boutique firms because they are the ones who truly have the need for our solution. Big law doesn’t need or care about what we do; they really have no real need for our solution. So keep your message, content and efforts geared toward the solos/boutique firms.

Are there special groups that these solos/boutique firm attorneys belong to, online and off? Find out what opportunities might be there for you to speak to their group or offer a webinar or give a presentation. You could teach them about what you do as an Administrative Consultant and all the ways your support helps their practice. Or, it could be about all the ways they can continue to operate in the online realm and further systemize/e-vitalize their practice and operations. (These are just a couple ideas, put your thinking cap with your own target market in mind. What would their ears perk up at? What are their common problems, challenges and obstacles, and what can you share that will help them?)

Talk to your area attorney associations and ask them if they have ideas on how you can connect with their solo attorney members.

If you know of some solo attorneys, TALK to them. And to be clear, don’t market to them. This is a knowledge and information gathering effort. Just see if you can speak with them informally and pick their brain. The goal is to learn as much about them as possible, what their interests are for their practice, where they are hanging out, online and off. The more you talk directly with people in your target market, the more inside knowledge you can glean that will help you in your efforts to support them, gear your solutions toward their needs, goals and interests, and find and connect with them.

Who/what are some of the vendors these lawyers use (locally, geographically and online)? There’s case management software services. There are process services. There are investigators. There are couriers, court reporters… the list goes on and on.

Contact these people and businesses. See if there are some advertising or co-marketing opps where you can take advantage of their own established footing in the industry to get in front of new prospective attorney clients. Maybe they have a blog or newsletter you can contribute to or advertise in/on.

Keep in mind that your services don’t compete with theirs; you are in complementary industries with the same audience. If you talk with them, you might be able to come up with some mutually beneficial referral partnering arrangements. Start the conversation; you’ll be surprised at what you might come up with, what ideas you hit upon.

Don’t be afraid to think outside the box and try new ideas. Get creative. Be up to try anything once.

At the same time, get good at recognizing when something or some place is a waste of time so you can move on quickly (and stay positive).

Do any of these ideas jump-start your thinking and how to apply them to your own target market?

PS: If you don’t have a target market yet, at least start thinking about one, especially if you’ve been struggling. Download my free guide on How to Choose Your Target Market